Keeping a finger on the pulse

REVIEWS - page 2

Kira Kira – Alchemy & Friends

in Explore/Issue #3/REVIEWS by

Words by Bartek Wilk Photo by Therese Precht Vadum The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 3) The title of Kira Kira’s fourth studio album speaks volumes. Alchemy & Friends, for me, offers a way to pass through a magic door to a fairy-tale world, yet not an entirely unfamiliar one. The artist behind Kira Kira, Kristín Björk, has been creating unique compositions with a special atmosphere for a long time. However, I must admit, her new album is a step towards more affordable music. Personally, I find it a good direction. Kira Kira had made us…

Keep Reading

It Might Get Loud – Smells Like (Pink Street) Boys

in Explore/Issue #3/REVIEWS by

Words by Stína Satanía The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 3) If you have never listened to the self-proclaimed loudest band of Iceland, let me give you a littledirection on how to wake up your neighbours on a Saturday morning with their latest bunch offurious punk rock songs. In October 2017, Pink Street Boys released the explosive Smells Like Boys on vinyl. The band took the local music scene by storm when they emerged under this name in 2013, and their garage punk smell, indeed, wafted across Iceland’s borders, resulting in asuccessful tour of the UK…

Keep Reading

A Dream Within A Dream

in Explore/Issue #3/REVIEWS by

Words by Wim Van Hooste The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 3) It has been three years since Epic Rain released their debut album, Somber Air,on the Lucky Records label. The band is the outlet of vocalist Jóhannes Birgir Pálmason. The departure of male co-vocalist Bragi has left more space for the vocal chords of singer Ingunn Erla Sigurðardóttir. The music is rooted in underground and alternative hip-hop, but in more recent years, Epic Rain began including aspects of cabaret, dark folk, country and blues in their music. Epic Rain’s lyrics are evocative and haunting, describing…

Keep Reading

Mimra – Sinking Island

in Explore/Issue #3/REVIEWS by

Words by Stína Satanía The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 3) Sinking Island, a new album by MIMRA, is a fascinating treat on the subject of vocal experiences. Hidden under the name MIMRA, singer, producer and composer María Magnúsdóttir offers powerful and dramatic vibes. Her electro-acoustic folk pop arrangements are bold and rich, and her beautiful voice is indeed striking. María has been active on the local music scene – especially the jazz scene – for quite some time. Her previous experiences with electro-pop duo Early Late Twenties gave her a base to work on her…

Keep Reading

Sometimes Hearing Is Believing

in Explore/Issue #2/REVIEWS by

Words by Wim Van Hooste The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 2) Ruddinn was once a solo project of einzelgänger Bertel Ólafsson. Today he teams up with vocalist Heiða Eiríksdóttir (Unun, Hellvar, heidatrubador) to produce some more electronic music in his studio in suburbia Hafnarfjörður. On this fourth Ruddinn album, More music than music (Möller Records), every song is dominantly driven by the crystal clear vocals of Heiða. The long player has a more mature feel than the previous releases, Ruddinn (2006), 2 (2008) and I need a vacation (2012). The latest sounded like Unun was…

Keep Reading

All The Kinder Versions Of Mammút

in Explore/Issue #2/REVIEWS by

Words by Stína Satanía The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 2) The Icelandic five-piece Mammút mix a high emotional depth with a thick and dark rock sound on their fourth album Kinder Versions, released on 14 July via the London-based Bella Union. The band signed to the foreign label last year, making Kinder Versions their long-awaited international breakout. This release also brings another change, with only English lyrics on the album, a first for the band. Mammút sprang to life in 2003. The band evolved into a quintet and quickly became a fixture of the local…

Keep Reading

I Love The Sound Of Breaking Glass

in Explore/Issue #2/REVIEWS by

Words by Wim Van Hooste The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 2) Especially when I’m lonely, I need the noises of destruction (Nick Lowe, 1978) GlerAkur (Glass Field) is the moniker of Elvar Geir Sævarsson, the sound designer at the National Theatre of Iceland. Down in the basement bar of the theatre, composer Elvar and friends (the longplayer was recorded with 4 guitarists, 2 drummers and 1 bassist) blended a full album featuring fierce and cinematic music. The hypnotic drone, metal riffs, eery ambient and post-rock make up a quadripoint where quality quantums meet. The album…

Keep Reading

All I Have To Do Is Dream

in Explore/Issue #2/REVIEWS by

Words by Wim Van Hooste The latest release by Sólstafir, Berdreyminn (The dreamer of forthcoming events), is the band’s sixth release in 15 years. On the previous releases, Í Blóði og Anda (2002), Masterpiece of Bitterness (2005), Köld (2009), Svartir Sandar (2011), and Ótta (2014), they ignored all genre borders, both metal and mental ones, and pushed the boundaries. The album was produced by Birgir Birgisson (Sigur Rós, Alcest) and Jaime Gomez Arellano (Ghost, Paradise Lost, Oranssi Pazuzu) at the former swimming pool Sundlaugin on the borders of Reykjavík. (more…)

Keep Reading

Ragnar Ólafsson’s Urges (to run)

in Explore/Issue #2/REVIEWS by

Words by Stína Satanía The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 2) Ragnar Ólafsson is a versatile musician who has established his name on the Icelandic music scene with such bands as Árstíðir, Ask the Slave, In Siren or Lightspeed Legend. Playing almost everything from chamber folk through jazz to progressive metal, he has tirelessly surprised listeners with his numerous sonic hats. On Urges, his debut solo LP released in June 2017, Ragnar once again reveals a new face. This artwork is different from all his previous achievements and goes a long way into his singer-songwriter outfit.…

Keep Reading

Sóley – Endless Summer

in Explore/Issue #2/REVIEWS by

Words by Bartek Wilk The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 2) When I think of the most fragile Icelandic artist, Sóley Stefánsdóttir is the first name that comes to my mind. I’ve been a fan of her talent since Seabear, always impatiently waiting for any new song she’s recorded. It’s been two years sinceher latest album Ask The Deep, following which EP Don’t Ever Listen came out. Incredibly good, stunningly dark, and deeply personal are words to describe the first album mentioned above. It was the quintessence of her image that I’ve painted in my mind through…

Keep Reading

Droopy Dog at the Olympics

in Explore/Issue #1/REVIEWS by

Words by Wim Van Hooste The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 1) At the age of 16, the duo Captain Fufanu (Kaktus and Gulli) mixed dub, techno, house and experimental electronica. But since 2015 there is no Captain anymore on board of the Fufanu boat. Two years after Few more days to go (2015), their debut album on the famous One Little Indian (OLI) records label, Kaktus and Gulli Einarsson found a drummer boy that goes by the name Bang. OLI is known for having a strong umbilical cord to the Icelandic indie foetus since Kaktus’…

Keep Reading

0 0.00
Go to Top