Keeping a finger on the pulse

Reykjavík On Stage

He wants to alter your every ego trip

in Explore/Issue #4/REVIEWS by

Words by Wim Van Hooste The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 4) After being introduced to synths and drum machines by Icelandic icon and producer Hermigervill, Davíð Berndsen developed a groovy pump-up-the-jam, retro sound. His debut album, Lover in the Dark (Borgin 2009), gave him some international exposure, and it was re-released in 2011 by 101berlin in Germany and in Japan on the Donuts Pop label, and in 2012 by Geertruida in the Netherlands. His second release, Planet Earth (2013), is the perfect music to strut around to, dressed to kill in your fishnet gloves, shoulder…

Keep Reading

The World Is Not Enough

in Explore/Issue #4/REVIEWS by

Words by Stína Satanía The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 4) Since 2003, the Reykjavík-based English–Icelandic musician, producer and singer-songwriter Joseph Cosmo Muscat has funnelled his music through different aesthetics, and now has had several projects under his belt, from metal (Celestine, formed in 2007) to hardcore punk (I Adapt), from electro to hip hop (Rímnariki). Last summer he dropped his third dreamy electronic solo album, entitled The World Is Not Enough, under the name Seint. On this album Seint was influenced by the sudden passing of his life-long friend IngólfurBjarni Kristinsson in 2017, to whom…

Keep Reading

Grúska Babúska – Tor

in Explore/Issue #4/REVIEWS by

Words by Stína Satanía The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 4) Grúska Babúska, a folk pop female collective with a melodic, other-worldly sound, released their self-titled debut album in 2013 and B-Sides Grúska Babúska in 2015. Their authentic fairy-tale style immediately drew attention. The band´s latest release, five-track EP Tor, was mostly written in 2016 during a week long residency in Glastonbury, UK, and dropped on the market on 1 September 2018. On the album, the band captures the influences of the historical, mythical and spiritual heritage of the town of Glastonbury, UK. Here, Amiina meets…

Keep Reading

Ólafur Arnalds´ revolution of sound

in Explore/Issue #4/REVIEWS by

Words by Stína Satanía The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 4) Over the years, Ólafur Arnalds has earned acclaim in both the contemporary and classical fields. His fourth solo album, re:member, was released in August on the new post-classical British label Mercury KX, which had already published his 2017 Island Songs as the first album under their umbrella. This time the BAFTA-winning multi-instrumentalist pushed himself out of the comfort zone and managed on just one album, to synchronise all the directions he has been spreading into – it has the classic sound of Ólafur Arnalds, with…

Keep Reading

Catching snowflakes with Árstíðir – Nivalis

in Explore/Issue #4/REVIEWS by

Words by Stína Satanía The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 4) As befits the English name of the band, the world of Árstíðir changes with every album – literally, like seasons. Three years have passed since this pop chamber outfit last released an album, Hvel. Much has changed along the way, but from the very beginning of their career, the band performed in a very high gear, which is now deepened with the maturity of their ten years’ experience as performers. One thing remains sure – Árstíðir don’t disappoint despite the quite high degree of my…

Keep Reading

Kontinuum – No Need To Reason

in Explore/Issue #4/REVIEWS by

Words by Andreas Schiffmann The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 4) This is dark music that dodges the usual traps, coming across as neither pseudo-evil nor faux melancholy. Kontinuum’s weightless yet substantial sound has always revolved around the voice of multi-instrumentalist and musical director Birgir Þorgeirsson, whose vocal chords arguably rival those of Ulver’s Kristoffer Rygg and Wovenhand’s David Eugene Edwards – both of whom are in their creative prime, like him and his troupe. On No Need to Reason, the frontman’s dominance is perhaps more obvious than ever before as he puts a different stamp…

Keep Reading

Dream Wife Are Here, and They’re Changing the World

in Explore/Issue #4 by

Words by Jeff Obermeyer Photo by Marcus Getta I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect from Dream Wife as I waited for them to take the stage in Harpa’s Silfurberg room. I was already a huge fan of Iceland-born singer Rakel Mjöll, having fallen in love with her performance on Halleluwah’s self-titled 2015 album, but I expected this to be something different from the old-school lounge stylings of that project. And it was. It was punk, and honest, and powerful, and Dream Wife were immediately in heavy rotation on my iPod. The band’s back story is fairly well-known. In 2014,…

Keep Reading

Big Ten

in Explore/Issue #3/REVIEWS by

Words by Wim Van Hooste The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 3) Hausi (Skull) is the tenth album by the band Stafrænn Hákon, once the alter ego, brainchild and playground of guitarist Ólafur Josephsson. Now, it has become a full four-piece band including guitarist Lárus Sigurðsson, bassist Árni Þór Árnason, and drummer Róbert Már Runólfsson. The album contains nine tracks composed by the band members between August 2016 and March 2017. The start of the album is reminiscent of 2016, when the band performed at Vinnslan in Tjarnarbíó and improvised 20 minutes of work based on…

Keep Reading

Stafrænn Hákon: Ólafur Josephsson In Da Hausi

in Explore/Issue #3 by

Words by Wim Van Hooste Photograph by Ómar Sverrisson He is a 42-year-old, 189-cm-tall man with dark hair that is naturally starting to turn grey. He lives in Reykjavík with his partner and their four kids. He works as a web designer in the travel industry, and has done so since moving back to Iceland from Denmark in 2010. This person is Ólafur Josephsson, who is the man behind Stafrænn Hákon, which started as a solo project and has since evolved into a full live band. Although he is not a formally educated musician, he makes music whenever he has…

Keep Reading

FM Belfast – Island Broadcast

in Explore/Issue #3/REVIEWS by

Words by Jeff Obermeyer The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 3) We stopped by FM Belfast’s Reykjavik office in November to pick up a copy of the band’s newest album, Island Broadcast. There to welcome us was artist and band member Lóa Hlín Hjálmtýsdóttir. During the course of our visit, we asked what she thought about all the construction cranes visible outside her window and the changes to the downtown cityscape. She compared it to living in the movie Dark City, where every morning you wake up to find that things have changed somehow overnight. She…

Keep Reading

Kira Kira – Alchemy & Friends

in Explore/Issue #3/REVIEWS by

Words by Bartek Wilk Photo by Therese Precht Vadum The review was originally printed in Reykjavík On Stage (Issue 3) The title of Kira Kira’s fourth studio album speaks volumes. Alchemy & Friends, for me, offers a way to pass through a magic door to a fairy-tale world, yet not an entirely unfamiliar one. The artist behind Kira Kira, Kristín Björk, has been creating unique compositions with a special atmosphere for a long time. However, I must admit, her new album is a step towards more affordable music. Personally, I find it a good direction. Kira Kira had made us…

Keep Reading

1 2 3 6
0 0.00
Go to Top